WE'RE HIRING! CLICK HERE TO SEARCH OUR OPEN POSITIONS.

Image is not available
Image is not available

PLEASE RSVP BELOW

04.21.16

5:00pm

Alhambra Palace

Presented by:

Chicago, IL

Slider

Articles in Category: TCM

Chronic Care Management and Infections in Older Adults

Chronic Care Management and Infections in Older Adults

Infections at any age are discomforting and potentially life-threatening. For older adults, infections may lead to complications for existing complex health conditions, chronic discomfort and poor health, and a greater risk of hospitalization or even death. One in three deaths of persons over the age of 65 is directly associated with an infectious disease. Symptoms and diagnosis are often more difficult because the typical signs can be misread or not frequently observed. A sudden change in mental status or decline in physical function may be the only visible sign in an older patient with an infection.

Osteoporosis and Care Management

Osteoporosis and Care Management

Osteoporosis is a disease that thins and weakens the bones to where they become fragile and easily broken. Osteoporosis is often called a "silent" disease because bone loss occurs without symptoms. Bones slowly and subtly lose density, becoming weaker over time. More than 50 million Americans either already have osteoporosis or are at high risk due to low bone mass. Although osteoporosis may be diagnosed at any age, it is mostly a disease of aging and predominantly affects older women. Osteoporosis generally isn’t discovered until there is a sudden fall or strain that leads to a broken bone or stress fracture. 

Many things can affect the risk of falling, such as a patient’s balance, weakened eyesight, uneven flooring, stairs, furniture arrangement, and home accessibility. A broken bone resulting from a fall can limit mobility and have a major impact on a patient’s quality of life. Patients may feel an emotional as well as physical weight following a diagnosis of osteoporosis. Thus, they may experience bouts of depression, anxiety, or weariness caused by effects of the disease. Those most affected by the disease may be afraid to leave their homes or participate in previously enjoyed daily activities fearing injury.

Parkinson's Disease and Chronic Care Management

Parkinson's Disease and Chronic Care Management

Parkinson's disease is the second most common chronic progressive neurodegenerative disorder. Like Alzheimer disease, the most common neurodegenerative condition in America, symptoms of Parkinson's patient's progress and worsen over time. Parkinson's disease is a disorder of the brain caused by a lack of dopamine that may result in shaking and difficulty with walking, movement, speaking, swallowing and coordination. Older adults with chronic conditions and complex illness may have an increased vulnerability to the disease. Parkinson's disease is one of the most common nervous system disorders for seniors over the age 50.

Post-Acute Care and Integrated Care Coordination

Post-Acute Care and Integrated Care Coordination

Older patients with complex care needs often require a diverse array of services to treat major health episodes, manage chronic disease, and maintain independent, healthy living. While many patients receive care in the physician’s office or inpatient hospital settings, a variety of other settings are available to patients who need certain specialized follow-up care. This care is provided in different settings, for example, long-term acute-care hospitals (LTACHs), inpatient rehabilitation facilities (IRFs), skilled nursing facilities (SNFs), and at home through home health agencies (HHAs). Collectively these services are described as post-acute care (PAC) and they support patients who require ongoing medical management, therapeutic, rehabilitative or skilled nursing care.

Mobility and Independence through Rehabilitation

Mobility and Independence through Rehabilitation

Rehabilitation programs can be extremely beneficial to improve mobility, balance, and strength after any type of illness or injury. For older adults who experience chronic pain and that have complex medical conditions, rehabilitation can impact how well they can get around. Rehabilitation can also include both occupational therapy and speech therapy. Occupational therapy helps make activities of daily living easier, while speech therapy helps older adults learn to communicate effectively. Proper rehabilitation and routine follow-up can help older adults regain or maintain their independence.

Image is not available
Image is not available
Image is not available
Slider

NavCare | 933 Broad St., Suite 301 | Augusta, GA 30901
844.804.1740 | This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.